How to Trade Panic explained by professional Forex trading experts the “How to Trade Panic” FX trading team.

How to Trade Panic?

If you lived in the United States before the year 2000, the thought of yellow and orange-jacketed traders screaming at the top of their lungs across a rainbow of other-colored jackets, slips of paper flying everywhere, is probably something you associate with markets and exchanges. These stressful environments were synonymous with the notion of markets. Emotions ran high, and depending on the exchange – one may even be risking their own personal safety by entering ‘the floor.’

Times have changed quite a bit; many exchanges exist only in cyberspace, no longer seeing the need for physical manifestations of their trading activity. Even the New York Stock Exchange; have you seen it lately? If not, just turn on CNBC, it’s not like it used to be (quite a bit more quiet these days).

But one thing that hasn’t changed is the fact that people love fast markets. Only now they mostly exist through the Internet, and now they are available to anyone willing to risk their money – not only the select few that could afford or draw on family connections for a ‘seat on the floor.’
When a big news event happens; or even perhaps a news event driven by an economic catalyst, like the 2008 Financial Collapse, markets can attempt to price in the newest data so fast that prices move at breakneck speeds. For the poor investors that are in long positions in mutual funds, the hope of stemming the bleeding before market close doesn’t exist. They have to wait and watch the devastation until the end of the trading day so that they redeem out of their mutual funds.

But to the trader that can take a short position just as quickly as ‘hitting the bid,’ these ‘panic’ periods present quite a bit of opportunity. Prices are moving fast and pips can stack up quickly – if you are on the right side of the trade. The big question is if this is something that fits in your trading plan?

What type of trader are you?

By many accounts – fundamentals and news events create price changes, thereby – fundamentals dictate what prices will do. Technical analysis on the other hand, analyzes past price movements, showing us what prices have done. And sometimes, what price has done in the past can help us build a game plan for the future; looking to those fundamental catalysts to create big price movements (the hybrid fundamental-technical trader).

The alternative approach is the trader that analyzes those same past events, looking to avoid those fundamental catalysts, hoping that the technical levels from the past hold true (the technical-range trader).

That’s really all there is. A pure fundamentals trader wouldn’t be looking at charts at all, and a ‘technical-breakout/trend’ trader would really be, in many ways, looking to fundamentals to continue substantiation of those trending/breakout conditions, so they wouldn’t really be a ‘pure technical’ trader.

Considering the fact that ‘panic’ markets can create rapid price movements in a short period of time, which can just as easily work against the trader as it can for them, it behooves one to know as much about their risk profile before wagering their hard-earned capital.

So, if you consider yourself a ‘pure technical’ trader, and have no interest whatsoever in following or keeping up with the news – I advise you to attempt to avoid panic markets. This can often be done by setting stops at major levels of support (or resistance in the case of short positions) so that when we do get those big breakouts – they don’t work against you too heavily.

For all those that dare to tread in fast markets – read on; and we will share with you some ways that experienced traders approach these volatile scenarios.

How to Trade Fast Markets

The same question was broached in the article ‘How to Trade Forex Majors Like the Euro during Active Hours,’ and the recommendation to trade breakout strategies could not be more on point.

As David shows in the article, increased activity often means larger and potentially more erratic price movements. And because these movements can be more erratic, it can greatly affect the trader’s ability to forecast price changes. The chart below, taken from the aforementioned article, shows how widely price swings can magnify on EURUSD during the London and the London/US overlap session (often considered the most ‘active’ period in the FX market).

How to Trade Panic Conclusion

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